Workshops: Busy Bees

single-bee02-smWell, we’ve been busy bees, preparing for our workshops in Brisbane next week. I’m running an Aged Care Chair Chi Training Level One workshop and Sue is running A Taste of Appreciative Inquiry.

We’re also busy promoting our upcoming Adelaide workshops for the end of August. And on top of all that my bee legs are going to get a workout, as I’ll be promoting the possibility of running the Chair Chi Training Level One workshop(s) in Europe. I’ll be in Europe from 22 September to 5th October, but if I find work there I’ll extend my stay by an extra week. Fingers crossed.

In our business, as in most businesses, finding work is the hardest part. But for us the delivery is a real buzz!

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The Sound of Comfort

Hands playing harpMusic is a powerful thing. As we said in a previous blog post, Music and Memory, it can have the power to ‘bring to life’ elderly folk with dementia.

Or, as I also wrote some time before that, music transports us through time, connects us with other people, helps to heal wounds, makes us laugh, makes us cry and feeds the soul.

More recently we’ve discovered another powerful way in which music is used to make a significant difference – this time at the end of life for those in palliative care. It’s something called music thanatology, defined by Music-Thanatology Association International as:

a professional field within the broader sub-speciality of palliative care. It is a musical/clinical modality that unites music and medicine in end of life care. The music-thanatologist utilizes harp and voice at the bedside to lovingly serve the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of the dying and their loved ones with prescriptive music.

Training programs for music thanatologists are currently only offered in the United States, although graduates of these programs work in many different parts of the world, including England, Japan, Israel, Scotland and the Netherlands.

To date, however, there is only one certified music thanatologists in Australia! His name is Peter Roberts and you can read more about him in The Sound of Comfort, an article published in Australian Ageing Agenda.

It’s an inspiring read! And The Harp and The Ferryman, a book Peter co-authored with Helen Cox, is definitely on my ‘books to read’ list, although time to do so has so far eluded me.

Peter is based in Geelong at the Institute of Music in Medicine, of which he is the founding director. So if you would like to learn more, you can contact the Institute – details are on their website.

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World Appreciative Inquiry Conference Adventures

Well, we’ve just been informed that the next World Appreciative Inquiry international conference is now official and will be held in South Africa, July 2015.Flying bird

Both Sue and I plan to attend.

The announcement has brought back memories of the wonderful times we had at previous AI conferences – 2009 in Kathmandu, Nepal and 2012 in Ghent, Belgium. Here are the Youtube clips we put together after we attended each of these conferences. Great memories!

Kathmandu – Nepal – 2009

Images Of Kathmandu 5.52 mins

A Chitwan Adventure – Nepal 5.30 mins

World Appreciative Inquiry Conference WAIC 2009 25.09 mins

Ghent – Belgium – 2012

Images of Ghent April 2012 10.47 mins

World Appreciative Inquiry Conference WAIC 2012 21.20 mins

We’re really looking forward to our next conference and catching up with all our mates. I think I’ll start packing now!

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Playful Inquiry: Try This Anyway

RobynStrattonBerkessel-TEDxRobyn Stratton-Berkessel, a colleague and dear friend of ours, is an ‘expat Aussie’ now living and working in the US. Robyn is also a highly experience practitioner of Appreciative Inquiry.

Recently Robyn was asked to speak at TEDxNavesink, an independently organised TEDx event. As Robyn said about her presentation:

The theme for this TEDx event is “Play”. It was a no brainer for me that “play” is a key outcome of engaging with people and groups through the lens of Appreciative Inquiry. When we ask people to discover the best of themselves and a situation, in their minds they access a positive resourceful state and there’s a rush of oxytocin – the “hormone of attachment” and bottom line – you feel better! A reservoir of positivity is unleashed.

Watch Robyn’s talk below and be inspired to engage in your own ‘playful inquiry’ … and perhaps experience the world a little differently’ !

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Kids: Sales and Customer

Here’s an enjoyable ‘Kid Snippets’ segment written by children and performed by adults. The children were asked to pretend to be a customer and a salesman and this is what they came up with. Kid Snippets

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Chi & AI Workshops: Abbotsford Convent

Sue and I were very busy last week running our workshops at the Abbotsford Convent here in Melbourne Australia.

Sue assisted me in running the Aged care: Chair Chi Training Level One workshop and I helped Sue run the A Taste of Appreciative Inquiry workshop.

Below are a few snaps I took of the convent and you can see why it’s one of my favourite training venues.

We’re running our workshops in Sydney at the end of June and they include; Agedcare: Chair Chi Training Level One, Falls Prevention … the Tai Chi way, Creating Great Conversations and A Taste of Appreciative Inquiry. The we move our ‘caravan’ on to Brisbane in July and Adelaide in August.

We still have places left in our Sydney workshops, but you’ll need to book now as we are finalising numbers and catering. If you are interested you can register here.

Abbotsford Convent

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Melbourne Workshops: AI – Conversations – Chi

BJ Seminars LogoWe still have places for next week’s workshops but you will need to register now to ensure your place in a workshop.

Here are the details:

Creating Great Conversations This one day workshop focuses on using “appreciative conversations” to enhance your communication in groups, organisations, communities – and your personal life. And there are times when all of us find ourselves struggling through ‘difficult conversations’ with colleagues or loved ones

A Taste of Appreciative Inquiry This workshop is designed for all those who are dipping their toes into the Appreciative Inquiry water and would like a simple and practical guide to this approach.

It is ideal for: CEOs, team leaders, managers, HR or OD practitioners and anyone interested in the Appreciative Inquiry philosophy, whether personally or professionally

Agedcare: Chair Chi Level One Ideal for those working in the aged care sector, staff, carers, volunteers. Learn how to deliver a Chair Chi session for low care and high care residents or elderly people in general

Falls Prevention the Tai Chi Way A new workshop that will enable you to teach the elderly how to prevent falls using selected and practical exercises and philosophy from Tai Chi.

For further information check our program schedule.

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